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Prague, Czech Republic
2008-09

Prague is one of the best preserved medieval cities of Europe and it is often called "The City of a Hundred Spires". Prague offers a wide selection of Romanesque, Gothic, Baroque, Neo-Renaissance, Art Nouveau, Cubist and Socialist-Realist architecture. On any given evening, visitors may choosCzech Republice to see one of dozens of concerts, operas, or theater presentations. Museums boast world-class collections of art and host international exhibitions. The Czech countryside has hundreds of castles, chateaux, and historic ruins. Moreover, there are thousands of kilometers of marked trails for hiking through beautiful landscape to visit these historical landmarks. The dreamlike quiet of an older, slower-paced Europe lures visitors from all over the world, and studying abroad in Prague gives students the chance to develop a genuine feel for the city and its history at a leisurely pace.

Czech Republic: Prague
CIEE Film Studies at FAMU
2008-09: Download Info Sheet

The CIEE Study Center in Prague has its own facility in the Vyšehrad neighborhood of Prague. Vyšehrad is a historic neighborhood in Prague 2, atop one of Prague’s highest hills and within medieval castle walls in a beautiful park-like setting. The location of the facility offers students and staff excellent access to the center of Prague, and a more relaxed, campus-like area with close access to predominantly Czech residential areas. The CIEE Study Center is located about 20 minutes from other faculties of Charles University.

This program is appropriate for students with a strong background in film studies and a desire to develop the skills necessary to work professionally in the film industry. It is designed for students with specific training and interest in film production or screenwriting and combines both theoretical and practical instruction and activities led by film professionals at one of Europe’s most renowned film schools.

The Film Studies program includes both practical hands-on and traditional university courses. The Production track has eight weeks of instruction, two weeks of guided pre-production, two weeks of production, and two weeks of post-production. The Screenwriting track follows a more traditional schedule, also fourteen weeks, and culminates in the creation of a feature-length screenplay. Courses are small and include both theoretical and practical exercises. The program is intensive in nature and requires both evening and weekend sessions, film screenings, and production work.

All classes are taught by FAMU professors. Professors encourage participation and active student engagement in the course material.

Program Dates
Fall (Late August to Mid-December) or Spring (Mid-January to Mid-May) Semester

Fields of Study
Czech Language, Acting Studio, Animation Production, Art of Intermedia, Camera and Film Language, Cinematography, Czech Language, Czech Surrealist Film, Directing, Editing, Film Mentorship, Filmmaking Practicum, Modern Visual Culture, Motion Picture and Digital Video, Production, Screenwriting, Sound Recording

Eligibility
3.0 CGPA; for the Production Track, students must demonstrate experience with 16mm camera production, directing and use of digital/video camera; Students must submit sample in DVD/VHS converted format, a portfolio of recent work, and 1-2 story boards for short film to be shot in Prague; Recommendation letters must be from major department professors.  For the Screenwriting Track, completion of a minimum of 2 courses in screenwriting or creative writing; film or screenwriting major recommended; students must submit an original screenplay and proposals for two additional screenplays  and recommendation letters must be from major department professors

Academic Program: All students enroll in an intensive CIEE Czech Language course during the first two weeks of the program. Students then separate into one of two tracks— Production or Screenwriting—and begin their required CIEE and elective courses at FAMU. Students work alongside FAMU faculty, staff, and students throughout the semester. Production students are required to produce a short 16mm film at the completion of the program. Screenwriting students complete a feature-length screen- play by the end of the semester.

Tulane awards credit at the 500-level; students generally earn 15 credits per semester.

Living Arrangements
CIEE offers students the option of a homestay with a Czech family, a double room in the Charles University Dormitory, or a double room in a CIEE-Administered furnished apartment.

Web links
CIEE Prague: www.ciee.org/study
Film & TV School of the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague: www.famu.cz 

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Czech Republic: Prague   
CET Jewish Studies Program
2008-09: Download Info Sheet

CET’s Jewish Studies in Prague curriculum was designed by leading U.S. scholars of Jewish History, Czech and Polish Studies, and the Holocaust. The multi-disciplinary curriculum provides an opportunity to examine the history, culture, literature, and the arts of Central and Eastern European Jewry, while at the same time offering a context for exploring the non-Jewish history, politics, and society of the region. CET's emphasis on experiential learning allows students to greet the local culture hands-on.  Jewish Studies courses are offered in association with the Charles University Faculty of Humanities. This arrangement Charles Bridge, Praguepromises to maintain the academic quality of our courses and provide students with additional opportunities for immersion into Czech society.

Goethe proclaimed Prague to be "the most precious stone in the crown of the world." Prague stands at the crossroads of Europe, where east meets west and history meets the excitement of a post-communist country transitioning to EU membership. Rivaling Paris as one of the most beautiful cities in the world, Prague will invite you to wander through its fairytale-like cobblestone streets and take in a thousand years of architectural and artistic history.

Prague, the medieval seat of the Hapsburg Empire, continued to strive as a sister city to Vienna into modern times, always standing at the forefront of culture and industry. Living in this dynamic city today, you'll encounter the challenges that the Czech Republic faces in this period of transition between Communism and the privatization of many political, social, and cultural institutions. Here is the perfect environment in which to become immersed in Czech culture and to explore the heritage of the Central and Eastern European Jews.

The first Jews settled in Prague during the Middle Ages. Throughout the centuries, Jews faced a great deal of persecution, but also thrived during periods of religious tolerance. The reign of Joseph II in the 1780s reversed centuries of official discrimination and relaxed the conditions of life in the Jewish quarter, renamed Josefov in honor of the emperor. You'll learn a great deal more about Prague's thousand-year Jewish history in your course The History of the Jews in East Central Europe.

Prague's rich Jewish history, its Jewish Quarter with six surviving synagogues which house the Jewish Museum, and the growing Jewish community make it an excellent setting in which to explore Central and Eastern European Jewry. The Jewish Museum in Prague contains one of the largest collections of Judaica in the world. The Nazis confiscated these objects from Jewish homes and synagogues throughout Czechoslovakia with the intention of creating a "Museum of the Extinct Race." Instead, the collection pays tribute to Czech Jewish life and to those that perished during the Holocaust. CET students utilize the Museum's extensive library and records for their coursework.

While Prague was home to about 55,000 Jews before the war, today's community has over 1,600 registered Jews, many of whom are survivors. There is also a growing group of young people who have recently discovered their Jewish roots and are searching for their Jewish identity.

Program Dates
Fall (Late August to Mid-December) or Spring (Mid-January to Mid-May) Semester

Fields of Study
Czech Language, Film, Communications, Art, Art History, Gender Studies, History, Literature, Music, Political Science, Psychology, Religion & Theology, Social Science; Film Studies

Eligibility
3.0 CGPA; Previous coursework in Jewish Studies; coursework with Central or Eastern European content strongly recommended

Academic Program
CET students attending the Jewish Studies in Prague program for the fall or spring terms will enroll in a total of five courses, which include: three required courses, JS250 History of the Jews in East Central Europe, CE250 Political and Cultural History of East Central Europe in the Twentieth Century, and CE100-300 Czech Language, as well as two electives. CET has an arrangement with Charles University whereby it is possible to take one elective course at the Humanities Faculty. Scheduled travel takes students to Poland, Budapest, Terezin (Theresienstadt) and Cesky Krumlov, a beautiful medieval castle. At least one excursion, lecture, museum visit or film screening is organized every week.

All CET courses are taught specifically for CET students, although in some terms Czech students may be invited to certain CET courses. CET works with its academic partners to provide additional non-Jewish Studies electives during the fall and spring terms. Non-CET courses are open to other international students.

Tulane awards credit at the 500-level credit for coursework completed on this program.

Living Arrangements
Students are housed with fellow CET students in an apartment in a Czech residential building. Each apartment will have a full kitchen, and will be located close to or in the heart of Prague and the Jewish Quarter. In some semesters CET may invite Charles University students to live in the apartments. CET room and board fees cover three meals a day. Students may dine in Prague's many cafeterias and restaurants or cook at home, using a meal stipend that CET provides on-site. Vegetarian cuisine and kosher food is available in Prague. Information for students with dietary restrictions will be included into the post-acceptance materials, and guidance will be provided in Prague by the resident director. Kosher students should also visit the Keeping Kosher section of the CET website.

Tulane Faculty liaison
Dr. Brian Horowitz, Germanic and Slavic Languages, Jewish Studies

Web links: www.cetacademicprograms.com

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Czech Republic: Prague   
CERGE-EI at Charles University
2008-09: Download Info Sheet

The Undergraduate Program in Central European Studies (UPCES) evolved as a joint effort of CERGE-EI and Charles University striving for a common goal: a top quality undergraduate educational experience focused on integral issues of Central Europe. These two highly reputable institutions work together to ensure American, Czech, and other European students a challenging educational environment in which they learn from experienced faculty, as well as from one another.

Study abroad students take part in courses organized specifically for UPCES.  Each classroom is divided into one-half American and one-half European.  The European segment comes from both students of Charles University and other European Erasmus students studying abroad in Prague. This integration guarantees that students take their courses in an international, multi-cultural environment. UPCES feels strongly that students can develop a true sense of the region through direct academic and social interaction within the local culture.  

Prague is one of the best preserved medieval cities of Europe and it is often called "The City of a Hundred Spires". Prague offers a wide selection of Romanesque, Gothic, Baroque, Neo-Renaissance, Art Nouveau, Cubist and Socialist-Realist architecture. On any given evening, visitors may choose to see one of dozens of concerts, operas, or theater presentations. Museums boast world-class collections of art and host international exhibitions. The Czech countryside has hundreds of castles, chateaux, and historic ruins. Moreover, there are thousands of kilometers of marked trails for hiking through beautiful landscape to visit these historical landmarks. The dreamlike quiet of an older, slower-paced Europe lures visitors from all over the world, and studying abroad in Prague gives students the chance to develop a genuine feel for the city and its history at a leisurely pace. 

To become lost in the winding streets of Prague is a wonderful experience. The city itself is a museum, filled with a rich collection of musical heritage, cultural activities, and history. There was no radical rebuilding of the city center during the industrial revolution, so the city has maintained its unique "old world "character. Whereas cities like Warsaw and Berlin offer little evidence of what they looked like in the 1750s, the urban design of Prague is not very different from what it was even in the 15th century. Prague did not suffer the damage of other European cities during World War II, leaving its medieval network of narrow cobblestone streets, gothic churches, and baroque palaces intact.

Program Dates
Fall (Late August to Mid-December) or Spring (Mid-January to Mid-May) Semester

Fields of Study
Czech Language, Film, Communications, Art, Art History, Gender Studies, History, Literature, Music, Political Science, Psychology, Religion & Theology, Social Science; Film Studies

Eligibility
3.0 CGPA; coursework with Central or Eastern European content strongly recommended

Academic Program
Students are required to take five courses, one of which will be elementary Czech language. The remaining four courses are chosen from the regular program offerings

Courses will meet for 45 academic hours per semester, including class time, related excursions, and exam periods; giving each course a rating of 3 credit hours. The one exception is elementary Czech language.  Due to its lengthened schedule (an extra 12.5 hours of instruction during orientation), Czech is rated with 4 credit hours.  Thus, a typical semester load will be 16 credit hours per semester. Class sizes are small, so courses are interactive.

Tulane awards credit at the 500-level credit for coursework completed on this program.

Living Arrangements
Upon arrival in Prague, students will have one week reserved for them at the Hotel Prokopka.  During this time, they will be looking for a flat with other UPCES students.  UPCES Program Managers will provide a list of realtors that have been used previously by the program and will ensure a quick and easy search for the students.  During this first week, UPCES Program Managers will be available to answer any questions or concerns the students may have.  At the conclusion of the first week in Prague, students will depart the hotel and move into their furnished flats

Web links: www.cerge-ei.cz/abroad/

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